Total phenolic, flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity of tamarind seed and pulp extracts

Authors

  • Le Phuong Ha University of Science and Technology of Hanoi, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Van Ngoc Graduate University of Science and Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and TechnologyGraduate University of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Trang Huyen University of Science and Technology of Hanoi, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Le Thi Thu Hang University of Science and Technology of Hanoi, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Kieu Oanh University of Science and Technology of Hanoi, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Tran Thi Tuyet Dai Nam University, 1 Pho Xom, Phu Lam, Ha Dong District, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Mai Phuong Graduate University of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Nguyen Thi Minh Hong University of Science and Technology of Hanoi, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay District, Hanoi, Vietnam

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15625/1811-4989/15930

Keywords:

ABTS, antioxidant, DPPH, Tamarindus indica.

Abstract

Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) has long been known for its high nutrition content and pharmacological potential. However, there is lack of studies on the content of antioxidants, phenolic and flavonoid contents of tamarind seed grown in Vietnam. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the seeds and pulps of Tamarindus indica from three different areas across Vietnam including Son La, Hai Phong and Sai Gon with regard to the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activity of their water and methanol extracts, as well as their cytotoxicity on a normal BKH-21cells. TPC and TFC were evaluated by the Folin–Ciocalteu reagent and aluminum chloride, respectively. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assays were used to investigate antioxidant capacity. The safety of T. indica extracts was assessed by using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Our results showed that the methanolic extracts yielded higher TPC (742.919 ± 50.360 mg GAE/g extract), TFC (68.492 ± 0.023 mg QE/g extract) and possessed stronger free radical scavenging activity (IC50 of 52.5 µg/mL) compared to that of water extracts. T. indica seeds from all three regions possessed higher TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity than those of pulps. Regarding the safety, in vitro analysis showed that tamarind seed and pulp extracts only became toxic to BHK-21 cell line at a very high concentration with IC50 values range from 143.77 µg/mL to 620.35 µg/mL. This study revealed that T. indica seeds and pulps can serve as functional food as well as potential antioxidants in pharmaceutical products.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Alfadda, A. A. and R. M. Sallam (2012) Reactive oxygen species in health and disease. J Biomed Biotechnol 2012: 936486.

Babbar, N., H. S. Oberoi and S. K. Sandhu (2015) Therapeutic and nutraceutical potential of bioactive compounds extracted from fruit residues. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 55: 319-337.

Bendary, E., R. R. Francis, H. M. G. Ali, M. I. Sarwat and S. El Hady (2013) Antioxidant and structure–activity relationships (SARs) of some phenolic and anilines compounds. Annals of Agricultural Sciences 58: 173-181.

Brand-Williams, W., M. E. Cuvelier and C. Berset (1995) Use of a free radical method to evaluate antioxidant activity. LWT - Food Science and Technology 28: 25-30.

Cardoso Lima Reis, P. M., C. Dariva, G. Â. Barroso Vieira and H. Hense (2016) Extraction and evaluation of antioxidant potential of the extracts obtained from tamarind seeds (Tamarindus indica), sweet variety. Journal of Food Engineering 173: 116-123.

Chang, C. C., M. H. Yang, H. M. Wen and C. J.C. (2002) Estimation of Total Flavonoid Content in Propolis by Two Complementary Colorimetric Methods. Journal of Food and Drug Analysis 10: 178-182.

Guneidy, R. A., A. M. Gad, E. R. Zaki, F. M. Ibrahim and A. Shokeer (2020) Antioxidant or pro-oxidant and glutathione transferase P1-1 inhibiting activities for Tamarindus indica seeds and their cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cancer cell line. J Genet Eng Biotechnol 18: 74.

Kurutas, E. B. (2016) The importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular response against oxidative/nitrosative stress: current state. Nutrition Journal 15: 71.

Mustafa, R. A., A. Abdul Hamid, S. Mohamed and F. A. Bakar (2010) Total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and radical scavenging activity of 21 selected tropical plants. J Food Sci 75: C28-35.

Razali, N., S. Mat Junit, A. Ariffin, N. S. Ramli and A. Abdul Aziz (2015) Polyphenols from the extract and fraction of T. indica seeds protected HepG2 cells against oxidative stress. BMC Complement Altern Med 15: 438.

Ronald, L. P. and C. Guohua (2000) Antioxidant Phytochemicals in Fruits and Vegetables: Diet and Health Implications. HortScience HortSci 35: 588-592.

Sim, K., S. N. Abd Malek and N. Wahab (2010) Phenolic content and antioxidant activity of crude and fractionated extracts of Pereskia bleo (Kunth) DC. (Cactaceae). African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 4.

Soobrattee, M. A., V. S. Neergheen, A. Luximon-Ramma, O. I. Aruoma and T. Bahorun (2005) Phenolics as potential antioxidant therapeutic agents: mechanism and actions. Mutat Res 579: 200-213.

Sudjaroen, Y., R. Haubner, G. Wurtele, W. E. Hull, G. Erben, B. Spiegelhalder, S. Changbumrung, H. Bartsch and R. W. Owen (2005) Isolation and structure elucidation of phenolic antioxidants from Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seeds and pericarp. Food Chem Toxicol 43: 1673-1682.

Truong, D.-H., D. H. Nguyen, N. T. A. Ta, A. V. Bui, T. H. Do and H. C. Nguyen (2019) Evaluation of the Use of Different Solvents for Phytochemical Constituents, Antioxidants, and In Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Severinia buxifolia. Journal of Food Quality 2019: 8178294.

Tsuda, T., M. Watanabe, K. Ohshima, A. Yamamoto, S. Kawakishi and T. Osawa (1994) Antioxidative Components Isolated from the Seed of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 42: 2671-2674.

Tungmunnithum, D., A. Thongboonyou, A. Pholboon and A. Yangsabai (2018) Flavonoids and Other Phenolic Compounds from Medicinal Plants for Pharmaceutical and Medical Aspects: An Overview. Medicines (Basel) 5.

Young, I. S. and J. V. Woodside (2001) Antioxidants in health and disease. J Clin Pathol 54: 176-186.

Downloads

Published

2022-06-30

How to Cite

Phuong Ha, L., Van Ngoc, N., Trang Huyen, N. T., Thu Hang, L. T., Kieu Oanh, N. T., Tuyet, T. T., Mai Phuong, N. T., & Minh Hong, N. T. (2022). Total phenolic, flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity of tamarind seed and pulp extracts. Vietnam Journal of Biotechnology, 20(2), 305–316. https://doi.org/10.15625/1811-4989/15930

Issue

Section

Articles